Ar15 vs. AK47 vs. Mosin Nagant 

I grabbed this off Tumblr. A few articles ago, I mounted a scope to my mosin. I haven’t used it too much- fired it out the window on my brother’s car the night I bought it. I assume I hit the highway sign, but it was still standing the next day, so it must have been a light load. 


My Mosin was a gift from Mike, and I swapped him an old Stevens 12 gauge break open with a broken ejector. When you went hunting, you cut a straight stick a little longer than the barrel, and pop the shell out by ramming the stick down the barrel. 


I’ve got an AR that I built, it’s nice. I’ve got an SKS, not an AK, but I enjoy it as well. The SKS is nice, it centers itself well, so you can pull up and nail your target without even thinking about it. I tore the throat out of a running groundhog from about 30 foot away. Serves him right for getting into Grandma Joe’s garden! 

By this comparison though, I need to use my mosin a little more! 


AR-15 vs AK-47 vs Mosin Nagant

AR15: You measure your misses by sub MOA measurements

AK47: You miss and, and aim a bit lower this time.

Mosin-Nagant: Even if you miss the shock wave of the bullet will kill the animal.

AR15: You are careful to keep in clean in the field.

AK47: You don’t worry so much about some dirt getting in it.

Mosin-Nagant: It still has gritty grease inside it from when the Finnish army put it into storage.

AR15: Your bayonet will do an alright job of butchering your kill if needed.

AK47: The bayonet doubles as a decent hunting knife.

Mosin-Nagant: Your bayonet can be used to spit roast an entire pig.

AR15: Nice and light for carrying over obstructions.

AK47: Handy package for carrying over obstructions.

Mosin-Nagant: You can pole vault over obstructions.

AR15: Melts IN the fire
AK47: Starts ON fire
Mosin-Nagant: Starts THE fire.

AR15: With a custom barrel, Varmint Scope, and gunsmith trigger job, you can vaporize prairie dogs at 600 yards.

AK47: With a good rain, you can wait hidden in the mud at the side of a watering hole and wait for the game to come to you for a shot within 10 yards.

Mosin-Nagant: With a solid shooting position, you can hit that deer on the other side of the valley… and recover the bullet in the tree it was standing in front of.

AR-15: Carried by elite special forces and highly-trained American soldiers

AK-47: Carried by illiterate peons and unwilling conscripts.

Mosin-Nagant-Nagant: Carried by Vassily Zaitsev.

AR15: Might just stop that charging terrorist with a three round burst

AK47: Would stop the terrorist in his tracks

Mosin-Nagant: Would stop the charging terrorist, his three buddies, and blow up the IED in the next block from the shockwave of the bullet…

AR15: Shoots a .22.

AK47: Shoots a carbine round.

Mosin-Nagant: Shoots a cannonball.

AR15: Shoot it in the air it goes a mile.

AK47: Shoot it in the air it goes ½ a mile.

Mosin-Nagant: Shoot it in the air and someone in Berlin gets hit by a bullet.

AR15: Sounds like a pop gun.

AK47: Sounds like a machine gun.

Mosin-Nagant: Sounds like the Trinity Atomic Blast.

AR15: Sometimes mistaken for a toy.

AK47: Sometimes mistaken for random parts.

Mosin-Nagant: Sometimes mistaken for an artillery piece, or an anti-aircraft gun.

AR15: Finicky when dirty.

AK47: Still works when dirty.

Mosin-Nagant: Arrives Dirty from the Distributor.

AR15: Makes a small hole in a tree

AK47: Makes a medium sized hole in a tree

Mosin-Nagant: Blows tree in half making firewood available.

AR15: Lots of fancy optics available

AK47: You can bolt some stuff to the side

Mosin-Nagant: Who cares about optics when the barrel is long enough to smack the enemy over the head without even leaving your foxhole.

AR15: Made by a stoned Eugene.

AK47: Made by an injured Kalashnikov.

Mosin-Nagant: Made by a drunken Belgian and a crazy Ivan.

http://therevenantrising.tumblr.com/

Civil War Spencer Cavalry Carbine

This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing for me.  Well, hopefully not.

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I was on Facebook one night recently.  I’m a member on lots of those forums for stuff for sale.  I’m always looking out for a deal on things and every once in a while, I find one.

I saw that on a local garage sale forum, somebody posted an old rifle.  The called it a Spencer and said it was from World War 2.  Nearly as soon as it was posted, the moderator got on the horn and said that sales of firearms were prohibited on the site.  They deleted the ad almost as soon as it was posted.

I have moments of wisdom, though not very many.  I had clicked through to the person’s profile and sent her a message asking for more pictures.  She replied back and sent a few.

The Spencer Cavalry Carbine was made in the 1860s, not World War 2.  I recognized it from watching Aquachigger’s videos on Youtube.  He’s found a few in the brooks and rivers where the Civil War was fought.  I’m not going to write all of the history on the Spencer Carbine here, but you can find links here for more information.

The Spencer Carbine was one of the first repeating rifles.  It loads from the back of the butt stock and is lever action, though the action is not that of which most of you are used to on say a Winchester Model 1894.  Look at the pictures and you’ll understand what I mean.

I called the lady the next day and went to her house.  Upon seeing the rifle, I knew I had to buy it.  She knew what it was worth, but was moving and needed a quick sale.  She sold it to me for a sum I don’t even want to type here.  I was amazed.

The cool thing about guns made before 1898 is that there are no federal laws regulating them.  If you find one online and purchase it, you can have it sent directly to your house instead of the usual routine, which is to have it sent to a Federal Firearms Dealer (FFL), where you have to get a background check.  Here in Colorado, it goes one step further.  Person to person transfers of firearms have to go through an FFL as well.  So if I want to buy a gun from Jim, we both have to go to the FFL, submit our personal information and that of the gun, then get it approved by the ATF.  That isn’t so with this rifle because it is from the 1860s.  No background checks are needed and I can send this directly to someone’s house.  Pretty neat.  I might add that ammunition for these rifles is nearly non-existent, so it isn’t like someone is going to go out and rob a bank with it.  And if they do, they’re sure to get caught because they are an idiot.

Here are some more pictures for those of you that are interested.  You don’t see these every day.  I found it a new home this week.  And line my pocket a little. 😉

Mike, Oscar, Hotel….out.